Freedom from Food Fights

It is mid-summer and maybe you are thinking that any nutrition goals you had for yourself or your kids will “just have to wait” until all of the vacations, summer grill-outs, and sleep-overs for the kids are behind you.  Let’s face it: most families admit that summer is a difficult time to change kids’ eating routines and food choices.  In fact, it is very likely that the last time you tried to suggest something green or unpackaged for a snack or meal, your kids threw a fit or rolled their eyes.  So, to avoid the energy drain and drama, you gave in to your kids’ pleas for “another snack”, “more dessert”, or their favorite fast-food drive thru pick-up.

Is there a way of out the family food fights without waiting for the school year to begin?  I believe so.  But don’t take it from me…  Here are a few of the tips that have worked best for the parents of my elementary and teenage clients who PREVIOUSLY claimed they had a picky eater at their table:

  •  There are no “good” or “bad” foods.  Experience tells us that as soon as we hear that a food is “bad for us” we want it and if it’s “good for us” we think it’s tasteless or boring.  Plus, many kids begin to associate their value as being “good” or “bad” with how mom or dad says they’re eating.  Instead, it is more helpful to refer to foods as “smart, in between, or empty” when it comes to nutritional value.
  • Nobody has to eat anything they don’t want.  I know, I know: this sounds crazy and does NOT jive with the “clean your plate” mentality that many of us had growing up.  However, research has shown that it takes  kids up to 10 exposures to a food (i.e., seeing, touching, smelling, tasting, spitting out, etc.) before they’ll eat and swallow the food comfortably.  So, the mere presence of that food on a kids’ plate counts as an exposure. They don’t necessarily need to eat it or try it before getting up from the table.  It may sound crazy, but it works!
  • Role model loving healthy food.  If you want your kids to eat broccoli, eat broccoli… without trying to convince them of how good it tastes or manipulate them into eating it, too.  Your kids are watching you and, eventually, will want to try the foods you are eating to feel grown up.  If you don’t believe me, you should ask the mom who was frustrated that her kids were only eating pop-tarts for breakfast.  They saw her eating a healthier version of eggs benedict with asparagus every morning and BEGGED her for some of their own.

These are just a few of many tips I teach for changing the food environment NOT just modifying the foods we eat.  Until we alter the language and “rules” we use in relation to food, we keep ourselves stuck in the food battles at the dinner table and feel trapped in the fights about food types.  If you are interested in more material like this, join us for our next Feeding the Kids Workshop: Raising Happy, Healthy Eaters at Heritage Behavioral Health Consultants. Click here for more details and to register.  There really is freedom  from this age-old battle with food for you and your children!

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About Danielle Mitchell M.Ed.,RD, LD, LPC

Danielle (McGee) Mitchell is a Registered and Licensed Dietitian (RD, LD) and Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC). Danielle graduated from Texas A&M University with a Bachelor’s degree in Nutritional Sciences, completed her dietetic internship from the University of Houston, and has been a dietitian since 2007. She completed a Master’s of Education in Counseling at the University of Houston and then obtained licensure as a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC). Danielle enjoys integrating her nutrition expertise with psychotherapy and counseling to help clients connect mind, body, and spirit. She provides individual therapy for clients with eating disorders, offers sessions in family therapy, conducts group therapy, and is passionate about integrative nutrition options for women’s concerns. She sees clients for anxiety, depression, adjustment disorders, career counseling, and trauma. Danielle enjoys public speaking and has provided several presentations on weight management, counseling in the nutrition setting, emotional eating, nutrition for autism, Asperger syndrome, and ADD/ADHD. She has guest lectured for counseling classes for nutrition students at the University of Houston. She hosts workshops for parents and caretakers called Feeding the Kids: Raising Happy, Healthy Eaters (see Upcoming Events). She is available, by appointment, for individual or group counseling as well as nutrition consultations or presentations.

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